Barite (IMA = baryte)



Barite, a barium sulfate mineral of the barite group, was noted by Genth (1891) and Penfield (1897) from Franklin, but was surely known earlier. Palache (1935) summarized the extant data on barite, and little additional work has been done. Isotopic data for Sterling Hill barite were given by Davis (1993).
Barite from Franklin and Sterling Hill occurs as both fine crystals in vugs and veins and as massive material. Crystals are commonly small, < 5 mm, but some are larger. There is much variation in the crystal habit, varying from equant to platy to bladed to prismatic. Barite crystals from high-temperature parageneses tend to be tabular, and those from later secondary veinlets are commonly prismatic, but exceptions to both observations are known. Prismatic crystals commonly have slightly curved faces.
The color of barite varies considerably; blue, blue-white, white, yellow, and brown specimens are known. The luster is vitreous to satiny to dull, and there are three directions of cleavage at right angles. No physical, optical, or chemical data have been published. Barite fluorescence in shortwave ultraviolet varies (white, blue-white, and light brownish-yellow colors are known); the fluorescence in longwave is weaker.
Barite is common at Franklin and is apparently more restricted in occurrence at Sterling Hill. Although occurring in small quantities, it is so pervasive as to be the principal sulfate mineral at these deposits. Among the various occurrences, it is most abundant where associated with calcite in large masses.
At Franklin, barite occurs as visible crystals in vein assemblages. Calcite is the most commonly associated mineral but, due to the near-ubiquitousness of barite, numerous minerals are associated with it, and only a few are noted here. The most attractive occurrence of Franklin barite is a vein assemblage with bright pink hodgkinsonite contrasting sharply with bright white platy barite crystals and forming one of Franklin's mineral treasures. Superb stout white crystals, similar to those illustrated by Palache, were found in a rare assemblage of superbly crystallized willemite, tephroite, hodgkinsonite, and pyrobelonite.
Barite is also found with hancockite, clinohedrite, prehnite, and manganaxinite in highly recrystallized material; with calcite as 3-4 cm rock-locked crystals with rhodonite in primary assemblages; and in many other associations. Palache (1935) mentioned barite from the Trotter and Parker Mines.
At Sterling Hill, barite is found in smaller amounts in general, and much may be unrecognized. It most commonly occurs in veins, as microcrystals associated with carbonates, arsenates, and numerous other minerals. It also occurs as localized large masses with calcite; both are fluorescent. An occurrence in a veinlet assemblage in wollastonite-bearing rocks was described by Jenkins (1994). (Dunn, 1995)


 Location Found: Franklin and Ogdensburg
     
 
     
 Formula: BaSO4
 Essential Elements: Barium, Oxygen, Sulfur
 All Elements in Formula: Barium, Oxygen, Sulfur
     
 IMA Status: Valid - first described prior to 1959 (pre-IMA) - "Grandfathered"
     
Fluorescent Mineral Properties

 Shortwave UV light: Typically bright cream (very pale yellow), Sterling Hill can also be yellow
 Mid wave UV light: Moderately bright cream (very pale yellow), Sterling Hill can also be yellow
 Longwave UV light: Weak cream (very pale yellow), Sterling Hill can also be yellow
 Additional Information: Sterling Hill can also phosphoresce yellow
     
 To find out more about this mineral at minDat's website, follow this link   Barite (IMA = baryte)

     
 References:
Dunn, Pete J. (1995). Franklin and Sterling Hill New Jersey: the world's most magnificent mineral deposits. Franklin, NJ.: The Franklin-Ogdensburg Mineralogical Society. p.628

Frondel, Clifford (1972). The minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, a checklist. NY.: John Willey & Sons. p.44


The Picking Table References
 PT Issue and PageDescription / Comment
V. 57, No. 2 - Fall 2016, pg. 12Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, N.J., Part 1, Richard C. Bostwick - Barite
View IssueV. 45, No. 1 - Spring 2004, pg. 9The Art of Fluorescent Mineral Photography, With Special Attention to the Minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill Photographing the More Popular Franklin and Sterling Hill Fluorescent Minerals - Barite
View IssueV. 35, No. 1 - Spring 1994, pg. 20Geology and Mineralogy of a Veinlet Assemblage Associated With Wollastonite-Bearing Rocks, Sterling Mine, Ogdensburg, New Jersey, Robert E. Jenkins II - Barite
View IssueV. 34, No. 2 - Fall 1993, pg. 16Recent Mineral Finds From The Sterling Mine Ogdensburg, New Jersey - Barite
View IssueV. 33, No. 2 - Fall 1992, pg. 10The Check List of Franklin-Sterling Hill Fluorescent Minerals - Barite (Fluorescent Info)
View IssueV. 24, No. 1 - Spring 1983, pg. 4Recent Mineral Occurrences at Sterling Hill, Stephen B. Sanford, Barite
View IssueV. 18, No. 1 - March 1977, pg. 20The Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, NJ by Richard C. Bostwick - Barite
View IssueV. 15, No. 2 - August 1974, pg. 9Fluorescent Corner - Barite
View IssueV. 13, No. 2 - August 1972, pg. 11The Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin/Ogdensburg Area by Frank Z. Edwards - Barite (Fluorescent Info)
     
Images

     
Barite, calcite and minor franklinite from the Sterling Hill Mine, NJ.Barite, calcite and minor franklinite from the Sterling Hill Mine, NJ. under shortwave UV Light
Barite, calcite and minor franklinite from the Sterling Hill Mine, NJ. Actual image width 2" (51 mm). Photo by WP.
Barite, calcite and minor franklinite from the Sterling Hill Mine, NJ under shortwave UV light. The barite fluoresces cream and the calcite red-orange, franklinite is non-fluorescent. Actual image width 2" (51 mm). Photo by WP.


Barite, calcite and franklinite from Franklin, NJBarite, calcite and franklinite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV Light
Barite, calcite and franklinite from Franklin, NJ. Photo by WP.
Barite, calcite and franklinite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV light. The barite fluoresces cream and the calcite orange-red, franklinite is non-fluorescent. Photo by WP.


Barite, hyalophane, calcite, and andradite from Franklin, NJBarite, hyalophane, calcite, and andradite from Franklin, NJ under midwave UV Light
Barite (white and gray), hyalophane (light brown), calcite (beige), and andradite (golden brown) from Franklin, NJ. 3 3/4" X 3 3/4". From the collection of Alex & Gary Kerstanski, photo by Alex Kerstanski.
Barite, hyalophane, calcite, and andradite from Franklin, NJ under mid-wave UV light. The barite fluoresces light pale yellow, calcite weak red, the hyalophane and andradite are non-fluorescent 3 3/4" X 3 3/4". From the collection of Alex & Gary Kerstanski, photo by Alex Kerstanski.
Barite, hyalophane, calcite, and andradite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV Light
Barite, hyalophane, calcite, and andradite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV light. The barite fluoresces bright white-cream, calcite red-orange, hyalophane deep red and the andradite is non-fluorescent 3 3/4" X 3 3/4". From the collection of Alex & Gary Kerstanski, photo by Alex Kerstanski.







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