Hedyphane



Is an Apatite Group mineral found in metamorphosed manganese deposits, a lead calcium arsenate chloride. It has been found as small brilliant crystals in open veins with willemite and calcite, as rough crystals embedded in calcite, and most commonly at Franklin as coarse granular masses embedded in calcite, in contact with rhodonite veins. Hedyphane is brittle, with poor cleavage and uneven fracture, and has a hardness of about 3.  Daylight appearance can be white to light buff to yellow with a greasy luster. Fluorescence is diagnostic; barely visible in short wave UV light, it fluoresces deep orange in mid-wave UV. Hedyphane is one of the few apatite minerals that can be accurately identified by simple XRD analysis, due to its lead content.

 Location Found: Franklin
     
 
 Year Discovered: 1830
     
 Formula: Pb3Ca2(AsO4)3Cl
 Essential Elements: Arsenic, Calcium, Chlorine, Lead, Oxygen
 All Elements in Formula: Arsenic, Calcium, Chlorine, Lead, Oxygen
     
 IMA Status: Approved
     
Fluorescent Mineral Properties

 Shortwave UV light: Orange weak
 Mid wave UV light: Orange, usually of moderate to weak brightness
 Longwave UV light: Very weak orange
     
 To find out more about this mineral at minDat's website, follow this link   Hedyphane

     
 References:
Dunn, Pete J. (1995). Franklin and Sterling Hill New Jersey: the world's most magnificent mineral deposits. Franklin, NJ.: The Franklin-Ogdensburg Mineralogical Society. p.650

Frondel, Clifford (1972). The minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, a checklist. NY.: John Willey & Sons. p.60


The Picking Table References
 PT Issue and PageDescription / Comment
V. 57, No. 2 - Fall 2016, pg. 19Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, N.J., Part 1, Richard C. Bostwick - Hedyphane
View IssueV. 33, No. 2 - Fall 1992, pg. 10The Check List of Franklin-Sterling Hill Fluorescent Minerals - Hedyphane (Fluorescent Info)
View IssueV. 25 No. 2 - Fall 1984, pg. 9Mineral Notes Research Reports, Hedyphane
View IssueV. 18, No. 2 - September 1977, pg. 14The Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin and Sterling Hill, NJ by Richard C. Bostwick - Hedyphane
     
Images

     
Hedyphane, rhodonite, willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJHedyphane, rhodonite, willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJ under midwave UV Light
Hedyphane (tan), rhodonite (pink-tan), willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJ. Photo by JVF.
Hedyphane, rhodonite, willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJ under mid-wave UV light. The hedyphane fluoresces orange-red, willemite green, rhodonite and franklinite are non-fluorescent. Photo by JVF.
Hedyphane, rhodonite, willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV Light
Hedyphane, rhodonite, willemite and minor franklinite from Franklin, NJ under shortwave UV light. The willemite fluoresces green, and the hedyphane, rhodonite and franklinite are non-fluorescent. Photo by JVF.







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